Understanding How Your Credit Can Be Good News for Your Interest Rate

So you’re taking on a mortgage, or considering it – congratulations! Also, good job. Educating yourself in financial matters is super smart (though seriously daunting and intimidating sometimes). When it comes to interest rates, it can be easy to dismiss the steps you can take to try and get better rates. However, there are many things you can do before even applying for a mortgage to improve your ability to get a lower interest rate.

It begins with keeping the following in good standing: credit, debt, savings, income, and other assets.

Having a low interest rate is likely going to be important to you in the long run. While a high interest rate may be easy to overlook when purchasing a home, you may feel the financial impact of a higher rate down the road. A higher interest rate will result in you paying more over the lifetime of your mortgage2.

Good credit can result in lower interest rates when you go to purchase a mobile home2. Many people don’t realize how important it is to keep your credit score up or to work on getting into a good credit score range.

When applying for a mortgage or preapproval, it’s also a good idea to keep an eye on your credit report and to promptly correct errors1. You should avoid doing anything that may negatively impact your credit throughout the process of purchasing a mobile home; this includes applying for new, additional lines of credit1.

While your credit score isn’t the only key to a low interest rate, it is one of the key factors2. Your credit report is the main record lenders have of how you spend money. It tells them whether you pay on time, if you pay what is owed, and how consistent you are. It’s riskier for them to lend when your credit score is low in terms of your perceived ability to make payments. It’s similar to a school giving a better scholarship based on grades. While it’s not always fair to those who really have to work for a high grade versus those who are naturally good test takers – both got the same grade. The same is true with credit. If your credit has seen better days, you can improve it with hard work.

Another key factor is your debt1.  A lot of debt may deter a lender from lending to you, or may negatively impact the terms of the loan. Lenders calculate your debt to income ratio, so you definitely want to pay off as much debt as you can before applying for a home loan. Many people only see their home as an investment and not as debt, which it is. A mortgage is probably the biggest loan you will have in your life. Owning a home can be rewarding, but it is also a big responsibility. The best thing to do is either consolidate or pay off debts that you can, or at least have proof that you can consistently pay towards your debt while also making your mortgage payments.

Your savings and income may also impact your interest rate and the terms of our loan.  Starting to save is obviously amazing when considering a mortgage. It also can look good when your interest rate is being decided. Savings can demonstrate to a lender that you can pay your mortgage payments. This can also be shown if you have consistent income. Having a steady job or creating a savings budget could help you when trying for a better interest rate. Assets such as land, cash settlements, etc. could also positively impact that way that you appear to a lender.

Understanding your credit is the key to reaching for a better interest rate. Don’t just accept a high rate. You’ll pay for it later. Do what you can to make your credit shine!

Start Improving Your Credit Today!

  1. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. 16 August 2018. How does my credit score affect my ability to get a mortgage loan? https://www.consumerfinance.gov/ask-cfpb/how-does-my-credit-score-affect-my-ability-to-get-a-mortgage-loan-en-319/

2. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. 16 August 2018. Seven factors that determine your mortgage interest ratehttps://www.consumerfinance.gov/about-us/blog/7-factors-determine-your-mortgage-interest-rate/

Understanding What Makes Up Your Credit Score

Part of accurately building your credit is by understanding it. That begins with a breakdown of the factors that play into your score. The assumption by many is that credit is based solely on our ability to pay back money. While that is an aspect – it’s important to look at the collective.

Let’s elaborate on the 5 components of credit. Below we’ve got some examples to further help explain what each section means. These are made up examples and do not pertain to actual people or advice.

    1. Payment History: How well you’ve done with paying back your charges – based off consistency of repayment. Example: Debbie pays a little over her minimum payment before the due date. 
    2. Amounts Owed: How much you owe compaired your credit limit. Example: Debbie’s credit limit is $500 and she has a balance on her credit card of about $50 at a time. This is 10 percent of her limit, so her ratio of credit to amount owed is pretty low.
    3. History Length: How long you’ve had your credit. Example: Debbie has a credit card that she’s had for about 10 years. It shows over time how she’s used the card and done with making payments.
    4. New Credit: Based off opening new lines of credit. Example: Debbie opened a credit card, got a car loan, and opened a store credit card all in within two months. This could cause her score to drop.
    5. Credit Mix: Diversity and amount of credit lines. Example: Debbie has 5 lines of credit now: a department store credit card, a car loan, a secured credit card, a credit card through a bank, and a major credit card.

Check out This Credit Infographic

Source: https://www.equifax.com/personal/education/credit/score/how-is-credit-score-calculated

Easy Wallboard Repair Technique

Whether you’ve got a fixer upper or you’re just trying for an updated look – repairing wallboard within your mobile home may be an easy fix. Check out the video to help you with this project!

Please use caution when handling the tools and materials described here – your safest option is to bring in a professional to do the work! Please also note that these repairs may not be covered by your home warranty.

Things to do before you begin:

  1. Call home manufacturer to purchase replacement panels
  2. Have serial # from data plate ready

Things needed for project:

  • Replacement panel
  • Molding to cover edges
  • Panel adhesive
  • 1”/1/4” finishing nails
  • Level
  • Measuring tape
  • Keyhole saw
  • Power saw or handsaw

See Mobile Home Update Ideas!

 

First-Time Homebuyer Resources

So, you’re wanting a place to call your own? That’s exciting! Have you done your homework? It’s going to take some preparation and research to purchase a home. We want you to be well-informed and encourage you to be your own advocate while researching and making home purchase decisions.

We’ve gathered some resources and information about being a first-time homebuyer and have provided them below. While by no means all-inclusive, we’re  hoping these resources will help get you started!

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Homeownership is closer than you think. Get creative with your options!
  • You’re probably familiar with FHA Loans. These are loans insured by the government, more specifically the Federal Housing Administration. FHA Loans generally require lower down payments but do require the payment of mortgage insurance premiums which protect the lender if a borrower defaults.
  • If you’re an active or previous member of the military, a VA Loan may be something to consider. These loans are offered to credit qualifying veterans, or their surviving spouses if service and entitlement requirements are met. There is a VA loan no down payment option.
  • If you’re interested in living in a rural area as designed by the USDA Rural Guaranteed Housing Program, a USDA Home Loan may interest you. USDA loan programs are designed to improve and grow rural areas and you don’t have to have a farm.
  • If you’re interested in living in an energy efficient home, you might want to consider programs that finance energy saving home improvements as part of the mortgage. Some are offered to first-time homebuyers.
  • Lastly, check your local home loan options! Inquire with local lenders who know the area in which you would like to live for financing options. You might be able to find a local down payment assistance program, or other alternative program that fits your needs!

Consider a Mobile Home!

Still on the fence? Wondering what you’ll gain by being a homeowner? Check out these benefits of being a homeowner!

6 Questions to Ask Yourself When Saving for a Down Payment

Investing in a mortgage is a big step. It’s one of the biggest financial steps an individual will take in their lifetime. So it’s important to weigh it carefully. Don’t be discouraged by the size of the choice – instead be encouraged by the variety of resources you can tap into.

Down payments will vary among lenders and in amount, depending on the loan program, type of loan, home price, credit score and budget. Below we’ve crafted some questions that will help you evaluate and analyze your ability to save for a down payment.

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Be ready for your down payment by asking yourself these important questions.
  1. Is now the time for me to purchase a home? In a society that favors the word “now” over the word “later,” this question may seem silly. But it’s not. Purchasing a home means saving consistently, making payments, paying additional bills, maintenance responsibilities, and more. Check out listings near you and see what’s out there. If you aren’t in a place where you can save or you haven’t been saving. It may be time to wait. Be honest with where you’re at.

     2. What down payment can I afford? The possibility of purchasing a home is exciting. However, often our eyes are bigger than our wallets. It’s important to be practical. Consider how much you can pay out of pocket for a home. That may mean going with a cheaper home or being stricter with your spending.

     3. What monthly payment does my income allow? Simple. How much do you or your household make in a month? What will your house payment do to that number? If it doesn’t cover the cost now – it won’t later. Consider picking up odd jobs or making a bigger down payment, or trying the next question.

    4. What changes in spending do I need to make? Everyone needs to evaluate their spending before purchasing a home. Sometimes we need to prioritize the way we spend money. Leisure spending may not always be an option. If purchasing a home is a goal, consider how you can cut spending or alter your habits.

Get Savings Tips Now!

    5. What method will I use to save money? Automatic saving accounts are the most widely recommended method of saving. Usually free, they can be drafted from your pay without effort from you. Banks sometimes have programs for first time buyers or you could invest. You could even try putting a dollar or change in a jar or bucket every day and depositing it every so often.

     6. Do I need to ask for lower rates? If you’ve tried everything above and you still need some wiggle room – evaluate you bills. Are you paying high interest rates on credit cards? Has your car insurance been the same for a while? Consider calling and asking for lower rates. This could put more money in your pocket.

Congratulations, you’re doing your research and preparing well! Are you ready to start saving or do you need to work on one of these questions?

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All Things Credit: Fact vs. Fiction

Credit is complicated. There are no two ways about it. The best approach to dealing with credit is to educate yourself. This takes time and sometimes it means making mistakes, but don’t let the past dictate your future, push forward.

If you’ve had a hard time with telling the difference between fact and fiction when it comes to credit — this sheet is for you.

Fact:

– Credit reports list your payment history

 – Credit reports from the three nationwide credit bureaus can be obtained free once a year

Credit scores are separate from credit reports, however credit scores are typically generated by credit bureau reports

If YOU check your score, it does not lower your score. If a lender does, it can lower your score

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When it comes to credit, do you know fact from fiction?

Fiction:

– The number of credit cards a person has boosts their credit

– The higher the income, the better the credit

– Paying bills late will always lower your score

– Bad credit is forever

From fiction to fact…

“The number of credit cards a person has boosts their credit”

Your credit score does not factor in how many credit cards you have, but it does factor in credit card balances, credit history, late payments and the amount of credit card balances in relation to total available credit. Having more credit cards provides an equal opportunity to pay on time and to miss payments. Again, it all goes back to responsible and timely spending. It’s the quality of your spending, not the quantity (it’s the amount being charged, not the number of credit cards).

“The higher the income, the better the credit”

How much income a person makes does not correlate to how they spend it.   Your credit report shows if you pay your bills on time and the frequency in which you do so.  While making more money may help you meet your payments, a credit score is dependent on how you practice financial responsibility.

“Paying bills late will always lower your score”

Don’t make paying bills late a habit. Most credit card lenders provide a grace period after the due date to make a payment. However, when paid after the grace period late payments are generally reported to the credit bureaus and can lower your score.

“Bad credit is forever”

Bad credit does last, but not forever. It usually ages off credit reports after 7 years, but that time can be extended if you have been through bankruptcy. That’s a good amount of time, but you can pay off debt.

Start Building Your Credit!

How to Build Your Credit

Credit. It’s a six letter word that packs a punch. It helps us buy a home, allows us to learn financial responsibility, and sometimes it gives us a little more freedom than we were ready for. If you’ve had a bad experience with credit before – take a deep breath and relax. Your days of fearing a number are over. You are in control of your credit – not the other way around.

So you’re thinking, “Where do I start?” Whether you have no credit or bad credit – understand that building it doesn’t happen overnight. Just like building anything else, it’s a brick by brick process. Let’s jump in!

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Credit can be intimidating, but there are plenty of tools that can help you!

Get organized This is the key. Without it the cycle continues. Buy a calendar or make one just for your bills. This will help you become aware of your due dates so that you make a habit of paying on time. Set reminders on your phone and/or computer. Do all three – remind yourself however you need to. Keep a wall of post it notes with payment dates.

If you get paper statements—highlight what you owe each pay period. Keep a file folder with “To pay” and “Paid” labels. If you don’t have paper statements—keep up with upcoming payments on a whiteboard. This is the easiest way to tackle debt and stay on track. It’s important. Make a system and stick with it.

Set your max spending (and stay under it) Credit cards and loans are great—they allow us the opportunity to own something we probably couldn’t before. Yet, they sometimes can feel like free money. Where we get in trouble is when we forget we have to pay everything back—with interest. So how do you control that spending?

Discipline. Give yourself a ceiling. For example, a card or company may allow $500. Tell yourself, my max is $100 and stick to it. You will still build credit and you teach yourself how to be responsible. Credit is designed to prove you are financially responsible. Use it to learn money maintenance and focus on necessity spending instead of purchasing luxury items.

Pay your balances in full when you can and maintain only a few accounts.

Keep up When it comes to your credit and payments—you are your own advocate. Know where you stand.

Consider getting a secured credit card or becoming an authorized user (Secured /Authorized user) Not all credit cards are the same. So if you struggled with one variety—don’t feel discouraged. There are more options. One option is a secured card. With a secured card you pay a deposit to hold the card. Your credit limit is the amount of your deposit. Essentially, it’s a safeguard should you fail to fulfill your payments. It’s good discipline because then you understand how much money is behind your card, and you have a strong incentive to make payments because you pay into it.

Another option is to become an authorized user on someone’s credit card. Find someone who is first and foremost financially responsible. The best person to do this with is someone you can learn from. Think of them as a credit mentor who can help you spend well and keep you accountable.

Start Evaluating Your Debt

There are many other ways to build your credit. These are just to get you started. Don’t wait.

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Why Checking Your Credit Report is the Best First Step

Honestly, I didn’t care about credit until I went to buy a home. Then it mattered – greatly. Unfortunately, I found it to be true “no credit is equal or worse than bad credit”. It’s a good idea to check out your credit score and report before buying a home. After reviewing your credit report and score, you might choose to pursue a home purchase or you might try improve your credit score first.

By law, you are entitled to one free copy of your credit report annually from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies. Unfortunately, some folks don’t know this and end up paying for what they didn’t have to. Also, some websites claiming to sell credit reports and scores are not legitimate. Be sure to check out this site to be sure you don’t get fooled by an impostor website.

You can visit one website to get your free credit reports from the three major credit reporting companies – AnnualCreditReport.com. You’ll have to input some of your personal info to retrieve your report. This is the same if you call or mail your request. If you create a myEquifax® account, you can get two free credit reports a year.

Credit reports offer you a lot of details – from debts and when you paid them to old addresses. Plus, things like payments, accounts, and actions within them that you may not know about. That’s why credit reports are always good to look at– because they may show information about potential fraud or identity theft and things that you may not be aware of. This may help you protect your credit score and history by letting you see whether all the information and account details are accurate. Then, if they are not, you can freeze your credit, place a fraud alert, or dispute inaccuracies.

What you may be surprised to find out is that credit reports do not list your credit score! Weird, huh? You’d think for sure it would.

According to Equifax®, there are a couple of ways to see your credit score.

  1. You can contact your credit card company or bank as sometimes they may provide your credit score to you as an account feature.
  2. You can purchase your credit score directly from any of the three major credit reporting companies.

Find More About Credit Scores!

How Escrow Accounts Work and Why They Rock

If you have a mortgage, then chances are you’ve heard the word escrow thrown around a time or two. But what is it exactly?

An escrow account is a helpful tool built into your mortgage. It allows for funds to be collected monthly to pay for your homeowner’s insurance and/or property taxes. By your mortgage collecting escrow, it ensures that your insurance and property taxes are paid in a timely manner. The benefit to you is you don’t have to worry about fronting hundreds or thousands of dollars all at once for your homeowner’s insurance or property taxes.

The formula is typically simple for finding the amount owed. Let’s say both insurance and taxes are escrowed from each monthly payment. The monthly payment is found by taking the total amount paid to both insurance and taxes for the year and then divided by 12. (The 12 is for 12 months.) That’s it! That would be your monthly payment in addition to your mortgage! Please keep in mind, some lenders may use another calculation that varies slightly and is also permitted by the law. Be sure to contact your lender if you have further questions as to how your escrow is calculated.

Occasionally, your escrow payments may increase or decrease. If that happens, either your insurance or taxes have changed. This will affect what you pay monthly. In most loan types, this is the cause of increase or decrease for monthly payments.

All in all, escrow accounts allow for your insurance and property taxes to be paid on your behalf without much extra work on your end!

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Researched and created by Rachel Mersinger

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